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■ (SPEC) Iris tingitana Boiss. & Reut.

1852, Botanical author Boissier & Reuter

Iris tingitana Boiss. & Reut. (Edmond Boissier & Reuter, 1852, Morocco); Subgenus Xiphium , Spanish Irises, Color Code B3L

See below:

Curtis Botanical Magazine plate 6775Bot MagRafael Diez Dominguez photoRafael Diez Dominguez photoRafael Diez Dominguez photoRafael Diez Dominguez photoKen Walker photoKen Walker photoIris tingitanaPhoto by Jeff Bennett-Dry Creek GardenThe Garden 1889 Table 720

References

Iris tingitana Boiss. & Reut., Pugill. Pl. Afr. Bor. Hispan.: 113 (1852).
Dykes 1913; notes this is an Iris filifolia misidentified as I. Tingitana
Baker gave the following description ;
"The large lilac-flowered Irises with a bulbous rootstock fall into two well-marked groups, firstly Xiphion and xiphioides, well know and wisely cultivated in pre-Linnean times; and secondly, the less known, more recently described, and rarer Mediterranean types, filifolia, Fontanessii, and the present plant. The latter possess a distinct cylindrical tube to the perianth above the ovary, whilst in the former there is no tube between the ovary and the diverging segments of the lmb. The present plant was discovered long ago by Schousboe and Salzmann in the neighborhood on Tangiers, but has only lately been brought into cultivation. It was first imported by Geo. Maw, and has been flowered successfully by Messrs. Leichtlin and Elwes and Professor M. Foster. Our plate was drawn from a plant communicated by the latter, which he flowered in April, 1884. Besides the presence of the tube, it differs from I. Xiphion in the growing bulbs shooting in the spring and not in autumn, in the stouter leaves entirely hiding the stem by their clasping bases, and in the much larger blade of the outer segments of the perianth. Prof. Foster calls attention to a point which has hitherto escaped notice, that whilst in Xiphion, tingitana, and filifolia the petaloid style is pressed tightly down against the claw of the outer segments, in xiphioides it is so much arched that a large insect can obtain easy access to the anther without forcing its way. It is very likely that these new Mediterranean types will prove more difficult to keep alive and to flower than their older-known allies.
The Tangiers plant figured as X. tingitanum in this work at plate 5981 is a form of X. flifolium, which I have called intermedium.
Description. Bulb ovoid, pointed; outer tunics thin, reddish-brown, with strongly-marked veins. Stem stout, terete, about two feet long, quite hidden by the bases of the clasping leaves. Produced stem-leaves six or seven, linear, falcate, the lowest a foot long, deeply channelled down the face, tapering to a point, pale glaucous green. Flowers two or three in a single terminal cluster; outer spathes-valves lanceolate, about four inches long, membranous at the margin and tip. Ovary cylindrical, one and a half or two inches long; pedicel short; perianth-tube cylindrical, as long as the ovary; limb bright lilac or purple; outer segments obovate unguiculate, three inches long, with a deflexed limb as long as the claw, with a bright yellow keel; segments lanceolate, concolorous, erect, as long as the outer. Styles with large deltoid erect plicate toothed appendages. Anther linear, much longer than the free filament."
F.C.C., R.H.S. 1872, shown by Maw;
Curtis’s Botanical Magazine, t. 6731-6792, vol. 110 [ser. 3, vol. 40]: t. 6775 (1884) [M. Smith]The large lilac-flowered Irises with a bulbous rootstock fall into two well-marked groups, firstly Xiphion and xiphioides, well known and widely cultivated in pre-Linnean times; and secondly, the less known, more recently described, and rarer Mediterranean types, filifolia, Fontanesli, and the present plant. The latter possess a distinct cylindrical tube to the perianth above the ovary, whilst in the former there is no tube between the ovary and the diverging segments of the limb. The present plant was discovered long ago by Schousboe and Salzmann in the neighbourhood of Tangiers, but has only lately been brought into cultivation. It was first imported by Mr. Geo. Maw, and has been flowered successfully by Messrs. Leichtlin and Elwes and Professor M. Foster. Our plate was drawn from a plant communicated by the- latter, which he flowered in April, 1884. Besides the presence of the tube, it differs from I. Xiphion in the growing bulbs shooting in the spring and not in autumn, in the stouter leaves entirely hiding the stem by their clasping bases, and in the much larger blade of the outer segments of the perianth. Prof. Foster calls attention to a point which has hitherto escaped notice, that whilst in Xiphion, tingitana, and filifolia the petaloid style is pressed tightly down against the claw of the outer segments, in xiphioides it is so much arched that a large insect can obtain easy access to the anther without forcing its way. It is very likely that these new Mediterranean types will prove more difficult to keep alive and to flower than their older-known allies.
The Tangiers plant figured as X. tingitanum in this work at Plate 5981 is a form of X. filifolium, which I have called intermedium.
Descr. Bulb ovoid, pointed ; outer tunics thin, reddish-brown, with strongly-marked veins. Stem stout, terete, about two feet long, quite hidden by the bases of the clasping leaves. Produced stem-leaves six or seven, linear, falcate, the lowest a foot long, deeply channelled down the face, tapering to a point, pale glaucous green. Flowers two or three in a single terminal cluster; outer spathe-valves lanceolate, about four inches long, membranous at the margin and. tip. Ovary cylindrical, one and a half or two inches long ; pedicel short; perianth-tube cylindrical, as long as the ovary ; limb bright lilac or purple; outer segments obovate unguiculate, three inches long, with a defiexed limb as long as the claw, with a bright yellow keel; segments lanceolate, concolorous, erect, as long as the outer. Styles with large deltoid erect plicate toothed appendages. Anther linear, much longer than the free filament. — J. G. Baker.
The Garden 36: 294. 28 Sep. 1889; African Irises...The Tangerian Iris (I. tingitana)— see the accompanying coloured illustration — though one of the most beautiful anddehcate of our bulbous Irises, is still comparatively rare in gardens. It was first discovered long ago by Schousboe and Salzmann in the neighbourhood of Tangiers, but only recently, not more than half-a-dozen years or so, has it been known in a living state. For its introduction we are indebted to the indefatigable efltorts of Mr. Maw, of Kenley.
Besides differmg from all the other Irises in its longer tube, the difference that appeals to the grower most is the fact of the growing bulbs shooting in spring instead of autumn, as do those of the Xiphion group, in the stouter leaves, which with their broad clasping bases entirely hide the stem, and in the much larger limb of the flower.
I. tingitana is certainly more ditlicult to keep in good condition than its older and better-known allies, the Spanish and English Irises. It is more susceptible to the baneful effects of our wet winters, and seems to require the protection of a cold frame to see it at its best. We ha\e managed it very well by planting the bulbs close to a south wall, but even here it causes trouble and anxiety in keeping the wet off. Indeed, we should not advise its being planted in the open at all, unless it can have the shelter of a coping or some other contrivance that would answer the same purpose. As a frame plant, on the other hand, where it can have plenty of space it is a charming flower and well worth care. D. K.
The Garden p. 234 1905 & The Garden p. 280, 1905
Grull. 1907; Van T. 1909; Wal. 1913;
Dykes, The Genus Iris 219. 1913;
Description.
Rootstock , an oval bulb, tapering to a point above, the outer tunics being thin, of a reddish-brown colour, smooth with well-marked veins.
Leaves , six or seven to each plant, usually springing from a clasping red spotted sheath at the ground line, rigid, channelled, the outer side glaucous green, conspicuously striated, the inner surface silvery grey, about a foot to 18 in. in length.
Stem , 18-24 inches high, completely hidden in the clasping leaves.
Spathe valves , 4-6 in. long, keeled, pointed, bright green, with a membranous edge and tip, 1-2 flowered.
Pedicel , an inch or more in length.
Ovary , 1½ in. long, trigonal, narrow with deeply grooved sides and thin walls
Tube , 1½-2 in., hardly visible between the diverging tips of the spathes (cf. Fig. 29).
Falls . The purplish haft becomes rapidly wider immediately above the base and then narrows before expanding into the almost orbicular blade, of which the groundwork is a light whitish blue with darker purplish veins radiating out towards the margin. A patch of yellow surrounds the end of the raised, almost orange, central ridge, which sinks into a greenish stripe along the haft.
Standards , linear lanceolate, with a canaliculate haft, 3-4 in. long by ½-¾ in. wide, with a wavy edge, rather darker in hue than the blade of the falls, erect, slightly connivent.
Styles , of the same colour as the standards, becoming very wide in the upper part.
Crests , large, almost quadrate, fluted.
Stigma , bilobed.
Filaments , cream or colourless, about equal in length to the anthers.
Anthers , 3/4 in. long, pale yellow.
Pollen , orange.
Capsule , long, narrow, triangular with a broad groove on each side.
Seeds , light brown, small, thick D-shaped.
Observations.
The flowers of this species are larger than those of any other member of the Xiphion group. They are distinguished by the long perianth tube (see Fig. 29) and by the tapering, pointed standards.
There is little doubt that the foliage of this plant varies considerably in size and sturdiness, the variation being determined either by the soil or by the climate of the locality in which the plants grow. Apparently the plant was first found by Desfontaines and wrongly referred to I. xiphium. Grenier and Godron saw that the presence of a perianth tube of some length made it impossible to refer Desfontaines' specimens to that species and it is curious that it should not have occurred either to them or to Baker to compare them with I. tingitana. An examination of the Paris specimens showed, besides the long tube, the characteristic, pointed, tapering standards and left no doubt in my mind as to their identity with I. tingitana.
It is unfortunate that this Iris, owing to its early flowering date, can seldom be induced to flower in most English gardens without special treatment. When grown under the same conditions as I. xiphium, it remains flowerless year after year, although the bulbs attain a considerable size and produce numerous offsets. In order to induce it to flower, I. tingitana must be given very rich soil and a warm position. A thick layer of several inches of old manure should be placed beneath the bulbs, which may themselves be surrounded with silver sand. A warm and sheltered situation is necessary and some protection from late spring frosts, which have sometimes been known to nip the flowers of this species in the bud in the month of April.
One of the most successful of Sir Michael Foster's hybridisations was the crossing of I. tingitana and I. xiphium. The former was probably the seed parent and there is little evidence of the influence of I. xiphium in the hybrid except in the fact that it flowers as readily as I. xiphium and is as easy to manage. The flowers and foliage are almost identical with those of I. tingitana and the linear tube of the latter is also present.
Waterer 1938; Barr 1938; Sutton 1928; Van Zonne. 1939;

Synonyms

Iris Fontanesii, Baker; Xiphion Fontanesii, Baker Iris xiphium Desf.

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-- BobPries - 2010-02-04
I Attachment Action Size Date Who Comment
6775_edited.jpgjpg 6775_edited.jpg manage 55 K 11 Jan 2012 - 17:55 BobPries Curtis Botanical Magazine plate 6775
Iris-tingitana-11.jpgjpg Iris-tingitana-11.jpg manage 174 K 21 Jan 2015 - 13:09 BobPries Rafael Diez Dominguez photo
Iris-tingitana-21.jpgjpg Iris-tingitana-21.jpg manage 187 K 21 Jan 2015 - 13:10 BobPries Rafael Diez Dominguez photo
Iris-tingitana-31.jpgjpg Iris-tingitana-31.jpg manage 156 K 21 Jan 2015 - 13:10 BobPries Rafael Diez Dominguez photo
Iris-tingitana-41.jpgjpg Iris-tingitana-41.jpg manage 181 K 21 Jan 2015 - 13:11 BobPries Rafael Diez Dominguez photo
Iris-tingitana-51.jpgjpg Iris-tingitana-51.jpg manage 73 K 21 Jan 2015 - 13:11 BobPries Ken Walker photo
Iris-tingitanaWalker6.jpgjpg Iris-tingitanaWalker6.jpg manage 108 K 26 Jul 2016 - 10:55 BobPries Ken Walker photo
Iris_tingitana_20-05-10_Rs.jpgjpg Iris_tingitana_20-05-10_Rs.jpg manage 31 K 07 Jun 2010 - 19:05 Main.deesen Iris tingitana
TingitanaTheGarden.jpgjpg TingitanaTheGarden.jpg manage 115 K 25 Jul 2016 - 20:30 BobPries The Garden 1889 Table 720
filifoliaCurtis1872.jpgjpg filifoliaCurtis1872.jpg manage 92 K 25 Jul 2016 - 20:08 BobPries Bot Mag
tigitana5.JPGJPG tigitana5.JPG manage 211 K 02 Apr 2024 - 14:25 TerryLaurin Photo by Jeff Bennett-Dry Creek Garden
Topic revision: r17 - 02 Apr 2024, TerryLaurin
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